Knotwerk by Ritchie Po: Bill Blass with the Balthus

KnotwerkByRitchiePo, Bill Blass, Balthus, Helen Siwak, Ritchie Po, Vancouver, BC, YVR

Suit & Shirt: Maxwell Clothiers (Made to Measure); Shoes: Browns; Pocket Square: Nordstrom

Who doesn’t love a big luxury car? One of the ultimate status symbols is to make the one major luxury vehicle purchase that announces your good fortune to the world everywhere you go. Be it old-world classic BMW, Rolls Royce or Mercedes, a flashier Ferrari or Tesla, or even a more democratic luxury brand like the Lexus, the name of the car you drive is the vehicle industry’s answer to couture labels.

This weekend in Vancouver, The Closet YVR and Knotwerk paired with our friends The Social Life to bring you coverage of the 2015 Vancouver Luxury & Supercar Weekend and Canadian Concourse d’Elegance. We’ve also covered the much-anticipated opening of Vancouver’s first-ever Nordstrom for Retail Insider. For such occasions, a bold knot built like a powerful engine worthy of James Bond was needed, so we turned to the Balthus knot for this week’s blog post.

KnotwerkByRitchiePo, Bill Blass, Balthus, Helen Siwak, Ritchie Po, Vancouver, BC, YVR

Image credit: Agree or Die

The Balthus knot starts off like the simpler Nicky knot: that is, upside down and on the other side. The idea is to create a bigger, bolder knot than the more prominent Windsor. This eats up a lot of fabric, so be sure to leave the narrow end a little higher than your belly button. Creating the anchor is key and builds the basic structure for the shape. The knot is essentially created by looping the wide end and crisscrossing (or overlapping) it a total of three times in succession. Once the third crisscross has been tightened, loop the wide end around the front of the knot, to cover the base. The finishing move is to loop the wide end up and over and through the central loop. It may not look all that different from the Windsor family of knots, but in person the effect is seen because it appears larger. This works well with wide, long ties that have a lot of fabric to eat up. If your tie is a bit too long, this is the perfect knot as the third loop by necessity uses up the remainder of the tie.

One thing to note in the video tutorial is that there is a way to make the Balthus knot even larger. You can do so by leaving it sitting high up to exaggerate the bulk of the knot. This works well if you have a bold pattern and want to show it off. However, you need a vest to cover up the bottom as the whole tie sits higher up and it makes it appear as if you tied it too short. As Alex Krasny mentioned in his tutorial, this look was popularized by the recently-ended NBC series Hannibal, and although it looks like a standard-issue Windsor, stands on its own.

KnotwerkByRitchiePo, Bill Blass, Balthus, Helen Siwak, Ritchie Po, Vancouver, BC, YVRThe beauty of the Balthus knot is that it anchors so well, it stays in place all day long. Even when zipping around town in an impeccably detailed luxury convertible, the wind shall not wreak havoc with your cravat. (We only ask that you never, ever drink and drive). It’s perfect for business and also for the ultimate event of the social calendar, this evening’s gala fundraising reception at Nordstrom in Pacific Centre.

If you’re looking for that perfect cravat for this evening’s event, a bold print like this vintage Bill Blass I’m wearing in the Balthus knot may be just want you need to blend in (or stand apart from) the glittery, moneyed guest list in attendance this evening. For more of our coverage from Nordstrom’s media launch last week, click here.

KnotwerkByRitchiePo, Bill Blass, Balthus, Helen Siwak, Ritchie Po, Vancouver, BC, YVR

Tie carefully, yours in knotwerk,

Ritchie Po
IG: ritchie.po

KnotwerkByRitchiePo, Bill Blass, Balthus, Helen Siwak, Ritchie Po, Vancouver, BC, YVR

Thank you to Stephen Millen of Autoform Performance on Clark Drive for the loan of the Audi R8 Spyder for this shoot.

(All photographs by Helen Siwak of THEClosetYVR)

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