Knotwerk by Ritchie Po: Jim Thompson with Trinity

Trinity, Jim Thompson, Knotwerk by Ritchie Po, Ritchie Po, Helen Siwak, Vancouver, YVR, THECloset YVR

Previously, we did a luxurious Diamond knot for the Lao Feng Xiang Vancouver opening on Alberni Street. In that post, I mentioned that knowing how to tie the Trinity knot is great preparation for tying the Diamond. Of course, I got ahead of myself and actually pulled a switcheroo, I did not actually draft a Trinity Knot blog post! For this week, if the Diamond knot was a bit too much to handle, we are giving you the simpler but hipper and no less distinctive Trinity knot.

Trinity, Jim Thompson, Knotwerk by Ritchie Po, Ritchie Po, Helen Siwak, Vancouver, YVR, THECloset YVR

The Trinity is tied with the little end. Start with the wide cravat at just above your waist. Using the little end, create a “spiral” and let the little end fall behind the wide end. This is essentially how one ties an Atlantic knot, but don’t finish off by tucking the little end into the loop. Instead, loop around the front to hide the spiral and loop over the top. You will be weaving the small end through the main loop. This is easiest done if you think to create small loops and weaving the little end through. Do this three times as seen on the diagram and in the video, and finish the third and final step by pulling the little end up and hiding this under your collar. You can make the Trinity Knot big and wide, or you can tighten it up and make it more compact. This is great for showing off bright colours or bold yet simple patterns.

This distinctive knot is meant to be evocative and announce itself to the world every time you step out wearing it. It’s not always the best thing to wear to a board meeting, but it can certainly turn heads if you work in upscale luxury retail or are a creative professional.

Trinity, Jim Thompson, Knotwerk by Ritchie Po, Ritchie Po, Helen Siwak, Vancouver, YVR, THECloset YVR

Shirt: DKNY; Shoes: Fluevog; Shoelaces: Stolen Riches; Belt: Calvin Klein; Socks: Happy socks; Pants: AG

Speaking of creative professionals, this cravat’s designer was certainly one. American business Jim Thompson was born in 1906 and was an architect by training. During World War II, he was a field agent for the CIA’s forerunner, and eventually became a wealthy silk merchant whose garment house specialized in Thai silk. Most famously, his Thailand-based company provided the silk for the original stage version of The King & I.

Incredibly, Thompson vanished while on holiday in 1967, his disappearance left as a cold case. However, like other cold case vanishings, his legend grew, and his company still flourishes to this day. We like to think that his legend adds a bit of mystique to his brand, and hope that you’ll remember the stories behind your ties and how you got them.

Trinity, Jim Thompson, Knotwerk by Ritchie Po, Ritchie Po, Helen Siwak, Vancouver, YVR, THECloset YVR

Tie carefully, yours in knotwerk,

Ritchie Po
IG: ritchie.po

(All photographs by Helen Siwak of THEClosetYVR)

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